pH-Independent Measurement of Hydrogen Sulfide in Liquids

H2S and ions in water (animation)

You’ve been measuring H2S in Water the Wrong Way

Measuring hydrogen sulfide concentration in a pH-volatile liquid (such as water) is much more difficult than in a medium like natural gas. As the pH increases, the H2S dissociates into its ions HS (bisulfide) and S2- (sulfide), which are not measured by a typical H2S sensor. A reading that doesn’t account for the presence of these other ionic forms is meaningless at high pH because it would grossly understate the total H2S loading of the fluid when the pH drops. Continue reading “pH-Independent Measurement of Hydrogen Sulfide in Liquids”

Crude Oil Is Getting More Sour. Are Your H2S Analyzers Ready?

Applied Analytics H2S in Crude Oil Analyzer

Crude Oil is Getting More Sour

The ‘sourness’ of crude oil technically refers to its hydrogen sulfide (H2S) content before processing. Crude can naturally contain up to 14% sulfur content by weight, but this percentage is comprised of myriad sulfur compounds; only a small ratio is H2S. Unfortunately, even very low levels of H2S in crude can cause excessive corrosion and degrade catalysts in the refinery. Continue reading “Crude Oil Is Getting More Sour. Are Your H2S Analyzers Ready?”